A Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz Tumblr

A Collection of All Things COA

mileswalser:

For this week’s #read78 #poetry book I read Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz’s Oh Terrible Youth. What I love about Cristin’s work is that not only is it technically tight and full of outrageous and well-placed imagery, but it is also fun and a joy to read even when she’s making you want to cry. I love that her work is never just sad or just funny, but an honest blend of the two. And this book is no exception. “Starling” and “This Mask is What’s Holding My Face Up” were two of my favorites. #writebloody #books #reading

Book Review: 'Dr. Mutter's Marvels,' By Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz | : NPR 

literatebitch:

I’m so excited for this book.

31 Days of Horror — Day 17, What’s New to Read?

persephonemag:

31 Days of Horror — Day 17, What’s New to Read?

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I’ve spent a lot of time so far this month discussing movies and televisions shows. But what is you’re a reader? What if you haven’t destroyed your attention span through over consumption of Lifetime movies, Internet gifs, and caffeine? While you work harder on succumbing to the perils of the modern age, here are some suggestions for new and upcoming book releases keeping in the spirit of the…

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taylormurch:

Currently Reading. I had every intention of reading Atlas Shrugged next, but I didn’t think I’d have the time to finish all 1,100 pages before the month is over, and I have my heart set on spending all of October reading horror. So, I’m segueing into the beloved charm of Halloween-time a little early with this book, “the mesmerizing, first-ever biography of the brilliant and eccentric physician and innovator who revolutionized surgery and founded America’s finest museum of medical oddities”. 

I have a good feeling about it. An old-timey era, the history of medicine, an eccentric physician, and oddities? Yes, yes, yes. Right up my alley. 

nprbooks:

Image via Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz

If you love Philadelphia’s creepy-awesome Mütter Museum, you should definitely check out slam poet Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz’ first novel, Dr. Mütter’s Marvels.

Our critic Jason Heller calls the book "a marvel itself."

With clinical precision, Aptowicz lays bare the facts of Mütter’s colorful, tumultuous life. But those are only the bones of the book. Through anecdotes, rich context, and an unabashed artistic license on par with Erik Larson’s novelized historical accounts like The Devil in the White City and Thunderstruck, she injects Dr. Mütter’s Marvels with warmth and wit. In particular, the doctor’s borderline fetishization of grotesque medical curios — which would come to rest in Philadelphia’s Mütter Museum, still standing and attracting tens of thousands of visitors annually — comes across as both a quirk and a virtue, the result of his fascination with how the human body can be not only healed, but resculpted. His work in plastic surgery underscores a larger point that Aptowicz reveals masterfully: Vanity and wanting to be accepted in society are two very different things, then and now

novelfirstlines:

Thomas Dent Mutter is dead and the world will forget him.

— Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz:  Dr. Mutter’s Marvels (2014)

stuffisalways:

I interviewed the way cool Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz about her awesome new work of page-turning history, “Dr. Mutter’s Marvels.”
We talked about the book, Dr. Thomas Dent Mutter, the Mutter Museum, growing up in Philly and so much more. Check it out!

stuffisalways:

I interviewed the way cool Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz about her awesome new work of page-turning history, “Dr. Mutter’s Marvels.”

We talked about the book, Dr. Thomas Dent Mutter, the Mutter Museum, growing up in Philly and so much more. Check it out!

nprbooks:

Image via Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz

If you love Philadelphia’s creepy-awesome Mütter Museum, you should definitely check out slam poet Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz’ first novel, Dr. Mütter’s Marvels.

Our critic Jason Heller calls the book "a marvel itself."

With clinical precision, Aptowicz lays bare the facts of Mütter’s colorful, tumultuous life. But those are only the bones of the book. Through anecdotes, rich context, and an unabashed artistic license on par with Erik Larson’s novelized historical accounts like The Devil in the White City and Thunderstruck, she injects Dr. Mütter’s Marvels with warmth and wit. In particular, the doctor’s borderline fetishization of grotesque medical curios — which would come to rest in Philadelphia’s Mütter Museum, still standing and attracting tens of thousands of visitors annually — comes across as both a quirk and a virtue, the result of his fascination with how the human body can be not only healed, but resculpted. His work in plastic surgery underscores a larger point that Aptowicz reveals masterfully: Vanity and wanting to be accepted in society are two very different things, then and now

englishistheartofbullshit:

Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz

From her book, Everything is Everything (Write Bloody Publishing, 2010)

When my body had forgotten its purpose,
when it just hung off my brainstem like a whipped mule.
When my hands only wrote. When my teeth only ate.
When my ass sat, my eyes read, when my reflexes
were answers to questions we all already knew.
Remember how it was then that you slid your hand
into me, a fork in the electric toaster of my body. Jesus,
where did all these sparks come from? Where was all
this heat? Remember what this mouth did last night?
And still, this morning I answer the phone like normal,
still I drink an hour’s worth of strong coffee. And now
I file. And now I send an email. And remember how
my lungs filled with all that everything? Remember
how my heart was an animal you released from its cage?
Remember how we unhinged? Remember all the names
our bodies called each other? Remember how afterwards,
the steam rose from us like a pair of smiling ghosts?

Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz, “December” (via poetrist), from her book, The Year of No Mistakes (Write Bloody Publishing)

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